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May the Great Commission never be something you only read about

Friday, September 12, 2014

Friday Links

It's Friday ... how 'bout some interesting links?




The Gospel and ... 


  • 9/11    A Terrorist Encounters Jesus  Thirteen years ago the horrific tragedy of 9/11 left its mark in history and has effectively generated a roller-coaster ride of fear with ups and downs and twists ever since.  Now with the atrocities going on in the middle east, Americans reportedly feel less safe than any time since 9/11.  Terrorism has become part of the nightly news.  As followers of Jesus how are we supposed to respond?  READ MORE

  • The Ice Bucket Challenge    Jesus & an Ice Bucket  The ALS Icebucket challenge.  Whether or not you love it, this challenge has brought in over $88.5 million dollars to the ALS Association.  Why has this Ice Bucket challenge so successful?  Similarly, why was the Kony 2012 video the most viral YouTube video in history?  What could Christians possibly learn about expanding the Kingdom of God from these phenomena?  READ MORE

Both of the above articles are from a couple of my GFM teammates here in Atlanta.  The one below is a series of 5 posts I wrote earlier this year:



Mapping the Diaspora


  • PeopleGroups.Info    Make sure you check out the maps!  Find where you live ... who are the nations living among you? 






Dallas Willard's "The Divine Conspiracy Continued"


  • Part One    Scot McKnight reviews Willard's recently published book.  In this article he looks back at Dallas Willard's life and previous work, as well as looking ahead to his series of articles about "The Divine Conspiracy Continued".

  • Part Two    Scot McKnight continues his review.  Here, he discusses the similarities of Willard's worldview to that of Abraham Kuyper.

  • Part Three    The review continues with a look at character and leadership and Bill Clinton.


Be sure to stay posted to Scot McKnight's Jesus Creed website for more on Dallas Willard and "The Divine Conspiracy Continued".



Honor and Shame for Missiology


  • HonorShame.Com    My friend, Jayson Georges' website.  Be sure to check out the video, "Back to God's Village," for an example of a Gospel message with an Honor/Shame worldview.  Also, download the 3-D Theology guide.

  • Jackson Wu    Wonderful articles and resources from a seminary professor in East Asia.  You may also want to read Jackson Wu's book, "Saving God's Face."


If you are new to the ideas of honor and shame, which most of us in the West are, then I suggest you begin with Werner Mishke.  Once you get the basics from him, then move on to honorshame.com, where you'll find some expanded thinking on this all-important theme.  One thing to note is that honorshame.com and Jayson tend to focus more on Muslim culture.  Jackson Wu, on the other hand, is focused more on East Asian, and specifically Chinese culture.  Jackson Wu's work can be more academic and technical.  If you really want to dive into honor and shame and how they relate to biblical interpretation, missiology, contextualization and theology, then you'll want to check out Jayson's and Jackson's works on Romans.


Monday, September 8, 2014

4 Fields Gold

This past weekend, I (and several other GFM church planters), participated in 4 Fields training.  The training was led by Nathan Shank, who along with his wife Kari, actually developed this training through several church planting movements in South Asia.  We had a wonderful time, not only through learning, but also through engaging the community.



I teamed up with a brother who has spent the past 40 years making disciples and planting churches among Muslims in Southeast Asia.  As we entered a local apartment community, we were able to speak with several people, trying to sow the Gospel seed.  We talked with a man from Peru, a Rohingya lady from Burma, and a family from Nepal.  With each of these, we weren't given the opportunity to share, even though we tried.

After feeling a little discouraged, we regrouped and prayed for the Lord of the harvest to lead us to where the soil was ready to receive the seed.  As we said "amen," and lifted our eyes, we noticed a young African man a couple hundred feet in front of us.  "There he is," I said expectantly.  Sure enough, the young man was eager to talk with us.

He said that he was 20 years old, a Muslim, and a recently resettled refugee from Congo.  Neither he nor his family had made any American friends since their arrival two months previous.  Not only were we able to pray for him in Jesus' name, but I was able to share my story of how Jesus saved me.  My partner shared the good news of Jesus.  We encouraged this young man to ask God to lead him to the straight path, to the truth.  This week, I plan to follow up with him and meet his family.

No matter how many times I get out into the community to sow the Gospel seed, God always comes through.  It never gets old, but is always fresh and leaves me hungry for more.  God's Word does not return void - that's a promise from God!  Also, even though I had been through (and even led) the 4 Fields training before, I was able to pick-up several "nuggets" from Nathan Shank that have already helped me flesh-out the training in our ministry here.  Below are a few of those little gold nuggets, that I pray will encourage/challenge you as you make disciples.


  • "When we start answering the questions, 'Who can?' and 'Who can't?' with biblical answers, then we will see a movement."

  • "In God's Kingdom economy, God always provides seed for the sower!"

  • "The Gospel = a proclamation of Jesus as Savior and Lord + an invitation to follow Him."

  • "Content (knowledge) does not create movement.  Obedience does."

  • "Training is not for competence, but for confidence."

  • "Knowledge + Obedience = Abiding"



Sunday, August 31, 2014

UPG's in Clarkston: The Master List


This is a draft list based on the database created by the Joshua Project, of ethnicities in the Clarkston community who have no significant Christian witness available to them (in their homeland).  More to the point, as the Joshua Project defines it:  "Unreached Groups lack enough followers of Christ and resources to evangelize their own people."



A number of the world's approximately 7,000 Unreached People Groups have found their way to Clarkston through the years.  One of the driving questions we continually ask at GFM is, "What are you doing to engage the nations with the gospel of Jesus Christ?"  Answering that question begins with knowing the baseline it presumes.  This list was created by local ministry partners at Friends of Refugees and Encompass World Partners as an initial attempt to identify that baseline.  They carefully sifted through some 7,000 data points to record this valuable information!

As best as we can tell, some 90+ UPG's can be found in Clarkston.  Hear me say, this list is NOT exhaustive, academic, completed or fully accurate, but the researchers did their best to collate refugee resettlement arrival data with 7 years of anecdotal and personal experiences, along with some specific web searches regarding several ethnicities' history of flight from war and conflict.

You may find it surprising which groups are classified as UPG's, especially since, in our very special town, many of them serve as leaders in local fellowships or even pastors and missionaries.  You are correct, we too were surprised, but remember that this is GLOBAL data and Clarkston happens to be quite unique in many aspects!

*******

Below is the list broken down into Affinity Blocs:
CLICK HERE for part 1 - Eurasia
CLICK HERE for part 2 - African and Arab
CLICK HERE for part 3 - South Asia
CLICK HERE for part 4 - Southeast Asia


UPG's in Clarkston


  1. Acharya Brahman
  2. Arab Sudanese
  3. Arab Tunisian
  4. Arakanese
  5. Azerbaijani
  6. Bama Burmese
  7. Banyun
  8. Barawan
  9. Bhotia
  10. Bosniak
  11. Brahman Nepali
  12. Chali Bhutanese
  13. Chhetri Nepali
  14. Darjee Nepali
  15. Dzonghka
  16. Fars Iranians
  17. Fur Sudanese
  18. Gangai Nepali
  19. Gujarati
  20. Hakka
  21. Hazara
  22. Jat Dalalm
  23. Jat Dhariwal
  24. Javanese Sri Lankan
  25. Kachin / Singhpo
  26. Kalwar Hindus
  27. Kalwar Muslims
  28. Kamar Nepali / Bhojpuri
  29. Karen Black / Pa-O
  30. Karen Yintale
  31. Kashmiri Muslims
  32. Kazakh Muslims
  33. Khatwa
  34. Khmer
  35. Koli Nepali Hindus
  36. Kurd
  37. Lap Lakha Bhutanese
  38. Lepcha Bhutanese
  39. Lhop Doya Bhutanese
  40. Limbu Nepali
  41. Magar Nepali
  42. Malay Muslims
  43. Mandaean Iraqi (Sabean)
  44. Mandingo Mandinka Muslims
  45. Maninka Gambian
  46. Manipuri Ponna Burmese
  47. Masalit of Sudan
  48. Mon Talain Burmese
  49. Mru Mro Burmese
  50. Myen Burmese
  51. Najdi Bedouin Iraqi
  52. Nyaw Yo Thai
  53. Nyenpa Bhutanese Buddhists
  54. Oromo Jimma
  55. Palaung Pale De'ang Burmese
  56. Palaung Shwe
  57. Pawaria Bhojpuri Nepali Muslims
  58. Pashtun Muslims
  59. Persian Iranian Muslims
  60. Phun Hpon Burmese
  61. Phun Thai
  62. Punjabi Burmese
  63. Rajput Nepali Hindus
  64. Rajput Nepali Muslims
  65. Rakhine Arakanese Burmese
  66. Riang-Lang Burmese
  67. Rohingya Burmese Muslims
  68. Saraswat Brahman
  69. Shan Burmese
  70. Sherpa Bhutanese Buddhists
  71. Sunuwar Nepali
  72. Somali
  73. Swahili Bantu
  74. Tai Laing Burmese
  75. Tai Lue Burmese
  76. Tai Nua Shan Burmese
  77. Tamil Brahman
  78. Tamang Nepali Buddhists
  79. Tamil Sri Lankan Hindus
  80. Tamil Sri Lankan Muslims
  81. Tajik Muslims
  82. Taungyo Dawe Burmese
  83. Tavoyan Dawai Burmese
  84. Tibetan-Central Buddhists
  85. Tigre Eritrean Muslims
  86. Toposa Sudanese
  87. Toposa Ethiopian
  88. Turk Bosnian Muslims
  89. Turk Meskhetian Muslims
  90. Upreti Brahman
  91. Urdu Muslims
  92. Wali Sudanese Muslims
  93. Wolof Senegalese
  94. Yadav Pakistani Muslims
  95. Yazidi Kurds

Thursday, August 28, 2014

UPG's in Clarkston: The Southeast Asian List (Part 4/4)


This is a draft list based on the database created by the Joshua Project, of ethnicities in the Clarkston community who have no significant Christian witness available to them (in their homeland).  More to the point, as the Joshua Project defines it:  "Unreached Groups lack enough followers of Christ and resources to evangelize their own people."



A number of the world's approximately 7,000 Unreached People Groups have found their way to Clarkston through the years.  One of the driving questions we continually ask at GFM is, "What are you doing to engage the nations with the gospel of Jesus Christ?"  Answering that question begins with knowing the baseline it presumes.  This list was created by local ministry partners at Friends of Refugees and Encompass World Partners as an initial attempt to identify that baseline.  They carefully sifted through some 7,000 data points to record this valuable information!


As best as we can tell, some 90+ UPG's can be found in Clarkston.  Hear me say, this list is NOT exhaustive, academic, completed or fully accurate, but the researchers did their best to collate refugee resettlement arrival data with 7 years of anecdotal and personal experiences, along with some specific web searches regarding several ethnicities' history of flight from war and conflict.



You may find it surprising which groups are classified as UPG's, especially since, in our very special town, many of them serve as leaders in local fellowships or even pastors and missionaries.  You are correct, we too were surprised, but remember that this is GLOBAL data and Clarkston happens to be quite unique in many aspects!



*******

Below is part 3 of 4 of the list according to Affinity Blocs:
CLICK HERE for part 1 - Eurasia
CLICK HERE for part 2 - African and Arab
CLICK HERE for part 3 - South Asia


UPG's in Clarkston:  Southeast Asian Peoples

Southeast Asia
(SE Asian & Malay)




  • Arakanese
  • Bama Burmese
  • Myen Burmese
  • Kachin / Singhpo
  • Pa-O Karen Black
  • Karen Yintale
  • Khmer
  • Malay Muslims
  • Manipuri Ponna Burmese
  • Mon Talain Burmese
  • Mru Mro Burmese
  • Nyaw Yo Thai
  • Palaung Shwe
  • Palaung Pale De'ang Burmese
  • Phun Hpon Burmese
  • Phun Thai
  • Rakhine Arakanese Burmese
  • Riang-Lang Burmese
  • Rohingya Burmese Muslims
  • Shan Burmese
  • Tai Laing Burmese
  • Tai Lue Burmese
  • Tai Nua Shan Burmese
  • Taungyo Dawe Burmese
  • Tavoyan Dawai Burmese

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

UPG's in Clarkston: The South Asian List (Part 3/4)


This is a draft list based on the database created by the Joshua Project, of ethnicities in the Clarkston community who have no significant Christian witness available to them (in their homeland).  More to the point, as the Joshua Project defines it:  "Unreached Groups lack enough followers of Christ and resources to evangelize their own people."



A number of the world's approximately 7,000 Unreached People Groups have found their way to Clarkston through the years.  One of the driving questions we continually ask at GFM is, "What are you doing to engage the nations with the gospel of Jesus Christ?"  Answering that question begins with knowing the baseline it presumes.  This list was created by local ministry partners at Friends of Refugees and Encompass World Partners as an initial attempt to identify that baseline.  They carefully sifted through some 7,000 data points to record this valuable information!


As best as we can tell, some 90+ UPG's can be found in Clarkston.  Hear me say, this list is NOT exhaustive, academic, completed or fully accurate, but the researchers did their best to collate refugee resettlement arrival data with 7 years of anecdotal and personal experiences, along with some specific web searches regarding several ethnicities' history of flight from war and conflict.



You may find it surprising which groups are classified as UPG's, especially since, in our very special town, many of them serve as leaders in local fellowships or even pastors and missionaries.  You are correct, we too were surprised, but remember that this is GLOBAL data and Clarkston happens to be quite unique in many aspects!



*******

Below is part 3 of 4 of the list according to Affinity Blocs:
CLICK HERE for part 1 - Eurasian
CLICK HERE for part 2 - African and Arab


UPG's in Clarkston:  South Asian Peoples

South Asia
(South Asian & Tibetan-Himalyan)



  • Bhotia
  • Brahman Nepali
  • Acharya Brahman
  • Saraswat Brahman
  • Tamil Brahman
  • Upreti Brahman
  • Chali Bhutanese
  • Chhetri Nepali
  • Darjee Nepali
  • Dzonghka
  • Gangai Nepali
  • Gujarati
  • Hakka
  • *Jat Dalalm
  • *Jat Dhariwal
  • Javanese Sri Lankan
  • Kalwar Hindus
  • Kalwar Muslims
  • Kamar Nepali / Bhojpuri
  • Kashmiri Muslims
  • Khatwa
  • *Koli Nepali Hindus
  • Lap Lakha Bhutanese
  • Lepcha Bhutanese
  • Lhop Doya Bhutanese
  • Limbu Nepali
  • Magar Nepali
  • Nyenpa Bhutanese Buddhists
  • Pawaria Bhojpuri Nepali Muslims
  • Punjabi Burmese
  • Rajput Nepali Hindus
  • Rajput Nepali Muslims
  • Sherpa Bhutanese Buddhists
  • Sunuwar Nepali
  • Tamang Nepali Buddhists
  • Tamil Sri Lankan Hindus
  • Timil Sri Lankan Muslims
  • Tibetan-Central Buddhists
  • Urdu Muslims
  • Yadav Pakistani Muslims


Sunday, August 24, 2014

UPG's in Clarkston: The African and Arab List (Part 2/4)


This is a draft list based on the database created by the Joshua Project, of ethnicities in the Clarkston community who have no significant Christian witness available to them (in their homeland).  More to the point, as the Joshua Project defines it:  "Unreached Groups lack enough followers of Christ and resources to evangelize their own people."



A number of the world's approximately 7,000 Unreached People Groups have found their way to Clarkston through the years.  One of the driving questions we continually ask at GFM is, "What are you doing to engage the nations with the gospel of Jesus Christ?"  Answering that question begins with knowing the baseline it presumes.  This list was created by local ministry partners at Friends of Refugees and Encompass World Partners as an initial attempt to identify that baseline.  They carefully sifted through some 7,000 data points to record this valuable information!


As best as we can tell, some 90+ UPG's can be found in Clarkston.  Hear me say, this list is NOT exhaustive, academic, completed or fully accurate, but the researchers did their best to collate refugee resettlement arrival data with 7 years of anecdotal and personal experiences, along with some specific web searches regarding several ethnicities' history of flight from war and conflict.



You may find it surprising which groups are classified as UPG's, especially since, in our very special town, many of them serve as leaders in local fellowships or even pastors and missionaries.  You are correct, we too were surprised, but remember that this is GLOBAL data and Clarkston happens to be quite unique in many aspects!



*******

Below is part 2 of 4 of the list according to Affinity Blocs:
CLICK HERE for part 1 - Eurasian


UPG's in Clarkston:  African and Arab Peoples

Middle East, North Africa and Sub-Sahara Africa
(Arab World, Horn of Africa & Sub-Saharan)

North Africa / Middle East
  • Arab Sudanese
  • Arab Tunisian
  • Barawan
  • Fur Sudanese
  • Kurd
  • Mandaean Iraqi (Sabean)
  • Masalit
  • Najdi Bedouin Iraqi
  • Oromo Jimma
  • Somali
  • *Swahili Bantu
  • Toposa Sudanese
  • Toposa Ethiopian
  • Tigre Eritrean Muslims
  • Wali Sudanese Muslims
  • Yazidi Kurds
Sub-Sahara Africa




Saturday, August 23, 2014

UPG's in Clarkston: The Eurasian List (Part 1/4)


This is a draft list based on the database created by the Joshua Project, of ethnicities in the Clarkston community who have no significant Christian witness available to them (in their homeland).  More to the point, as the Joshua Project defines it:  "Unreached Groups lack enough followers of Christ and resources to evangelize their own people."



A number of the world's approximately 7,000 Unreached People Groups have found their way to Clarkston through the years.  One of the driving questions we continually ask at GFM is, "What are you doing to engage the nations with the gospel of Jesus Christ?"  Answering that question begins with knowing the baseline it presumes.  This list was created by local ministry partners at Friends of Refugees and Encompass World Partners as an initial attempt to identify that baseline.  They carefully sifted through some 7,000 data points to record this valuable information!


As best as we can tell, some 90+ UPG's can be found in Clarkston.  Hear me say, this list is NOT exhaustive, academic, completed or fully accurate, but the researchers did their best to collate refugee resettlement arrival data with 7 years of anecdotal and personal experiences, along with some specific web searches regarding several ethnicities' history of flight from war and conflict.



You may find it surprising which groups are classified as UPG's, especially since, in our very special town, many of them serve as leaders in local fellowships or even pastors and missionaries.  You are correct, we too were surprised, but remember that this is GLOBAL data and Clarkston happens to be quite unique in many aspects!



*******

Below is part 1 of 4 of the list according to Affinity Blocs:


UPG's in Clarkston:  European and Central Asian Peoples

Europe & Central Asia
(Eurasian, Iranian-Median and Turkic peoples)

  • Azerbaijani
  • Bosniak
  • Fars Iranians
  • Hazara
  • Kazakh Muslims
  • Pashtun Muslims
  • Persian Iranian Muslims
  • Tajik Muslims
  • Turk Bosnian Muslims
  • Turk Meskhetian Muslims